Systems Transformation

Systems Transformation

When we address or attempt to transform outcomes from a systems level, we must acknowledge that systems are all connected and impact how people’s day-to-day lives play out in the short term and the long term. Systems can determine where people live and their ability to navigate their communities. This in turn affects where they work. Workplaces provide opportunities for social connections and can then affect their mental well-being, creating more opportunities for community involvement. All of these parts of one’s life contribute to quality of life. This is equally true for people with disabilities.  Therefore, we must recognize the deficits in our current systems in which employment, living arrangements, transportation, health and other areas are treated in “siloes” instead of developing the comprehensive, coordinated systems of care that are needed to move the needle on outcomes.